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Green Lantern Corps #33 [Review]

Emerald Eclipse part one

Story & Words: Peter J. Tomasi
Penciller: Patrick Gleason
Inker: Rebecca Buchman
Colorist: Randy Mayor
Letterer: Steve Wands
Editor: Adam Schlagman
Cover: Gleason, Buchman & Nei Ruffino
Publisher: DC Comics

Mongul arrives on Daxam, where his arm (powered by yellow rings) makes short work of defenses. Mongul is here to set up a new home base for the Sinestro Corps, of which he now considers himself the leader. He sends out a signal to draw remaining members of said corps to Daxam, while he terrorizes native citizens. Meanwhile, Kyle and Soranik discuss where they’re going to go in terms of their blossoming relationship, particularly in light of the latest new law added to the Book of Oa by the Guardians–that there can be no romance between Corps. members. A short segment at the end of the main story brings someone from Sodam Yat’s past back into his life.

The story holds potential, and is heightened a bit simply by the billing of “Prelude to Blackest Night on the cover (as well as the loaded story title Emerald Eclipse, given prior major GL arcs Emerald Whatever). Mongul having his amputated arm acting in his stead seems really over the top to me (even in a book with aliens and little rings that harness the emotional spectrum and all that). Though technically focusing on the GL Corps as a large body, this book feels like it’s Kyle and Guy’s book…and that’s something I’m liking. That I’m so greatly enjoying the Kyle/Guy interaction is certainly testament to Tomasi’s writing.

Not a huge fan of Gleason’s art, but it holds a fairly solid consistency from recent issues, so though not my preferred visual style for these characters compared to depictions in Green Lantern, I can’t fault it in and of itself.

The main story here is fairly solid, and moves the story forward, fleshing out reactions to events and setting into motion stuff that’ll obviously be touched on as this arc builds.

Origins & Omens

This backup seems rather out of place as it doesn’t feel like it quite fits the title. However, it certainly does what a good backup should: though a mere six pages, it tells a nice little story that expands on stuff found in the main story. Basically, Kyle and Guy are priming the surface of a building that Kyle’s going to draw a mural on–the history of the GL Corps. He’s determined to do it by hand, no cheating with the ring (much as Hal is about flying a plane without the ring), and adds that little bit of characterization to Kyle. We also get to see some other lanterns with tidmits of insight into them, as well as the way they’d react to the actions one Lantern is about to undertake.

All in all, not a bad issue, though not stellar, either. That the backup expands as it does on Kyle’s artisitic undertaking justifies the shortened main story, and so the backup works, giving for a solid issue on the whole.

Story: 7/10
Art: 7/10
Whole: 7/10

Booster Gold #17 [Review]

Full review posted to comixtreme.com.

Action Comics #874 [Review]

Suspicion!

Writer: James Robinson
Penciller: Pablo Raimondi
Inkers: Pablo Raimondi & Walden Wong
Colorist: Hi-Fi
Letterer: Rob Leigh
Asst. Editor: Wil Moss
Editor: Matt Idelson
Cover: Aaron Lopresti & Hi-Fi
Publisher: DC Comics

This issue picks up with Superman having a bit of a tantrum on New Krypton at the fact that General Zod not only has been freed of the Phantom Zone but that he now lead’s New Krypton’s army. After fists fail, talking ensues, and Superman grudgingly seems to let things slide for now, though he makes known his misgivings.Back on Earth, Kryptonians–with a specific exception made for Superman–are banned, which sparks the new Flamebird and Nightwing into action as their clock is ticking (and a blurb informing readers to follow them into next month’s Action Comics). Superman and Lois visit his fortress while he ponders things, and then a voice from his past cries out, leading to the issue’s cliffhanger.

The story isn’t bad, but really lacks some “oomph!” I find myself actually bored by the New Krypton stuff, especially given the abrupt ending of the titled story while this still feels like it should fall under that heading. This story also feels like filler, just sorta moving pieces on the board around to force stuff into a new status quo for next month with the Superman family of books.

The art also is not bad, but doesn’t particularly thrill me. Not bad, but not spectacular. It gets stuff across that needs gotten across, but doesn’t begin to get in line to be art I’d specifically choose for Superman.

Origins & Omens

Writer: James Robinson
Penciller: Renato Guedes
Inker: Jose Wilson Magalhaes
Colorist: David Curiel
Letterer: Rob Leigh
Asst. Editor: Wil Moss
Editor: Matt Idelson

This backup stars The Guardian, and basically follows him through some (for him) relatively normal activities in his new job as head of the Science Police. Some of his history is touched upon–particularly recent developments/revelations, with some hints of what may be in store for him given.

Though I don’t particularly care for Guedes’ art style, it works for me pretty well here–perhaps because it’s not Superman/Clark himself depicted but other characters I don’t have so firm an idea in my head as to what they look like. The story is basic, but then, six pages is hardly room for any great storytelling for the most part.

If you’ve been following everything New Krypton, or the “triangle numbers,” this is worthwhile, This is probably also worthwhile as a bit of a prologue to the new status quo for Superman and Action Comics to come. That the main story is shorted for the backup doesn’t exactly make the issue all that enticing.

Story: 6/10
Art: 6/10
Whole: 6/10

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