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Getting Into Comics With High Numbers

I was introduced to comics in late 1988 with a stack of Silver Age books Mom had grandpa bring for me–to my knowledge, he simply grabbed a bunch from a cabinet that he and my uncle kept them in…so there was a mix of “Batman” and “Superman” stuff, and probably other DC characters…possibly some Marvel, but they were more DC guys than Marvel.

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In spring 1989 when I learned that they STILL MADE COMICS, that one could still buy NEW COMICS, brand-new, these stories were STILL GOING ON, it was Mom that bought me my first four comics: Detective Comics #604, Adventures of Superman #453, Batman #439, and Superman (rebooted) #31. Not a #1 amidst them, and at the time absolutely no knowledge nor expectation of backtracking TO a #1. When Action Comics eventually returned to the “Superman Family,” it was still several months before I came across the title myself, and my first issue was #651.

It was Captain America #425-beginning the twelve-part Fighting Chance story–that primarily pulled me into having an interest on that title (and that after it not bothering me at all seeing a #400 on an issue tying into Operation: Galactic Storm), and it wasn’t a new creative team or a new #1 that got me into The Flash…it was simply the start of a new arc at #197 with the ongoing/continuing team that led me into several years of following the book, into Infinite Crisis and all the shenanigans with the character, series, numbering from there.

Maybe once upon a time, a #1 was special or significant…but now with ENTIRE LINES being restarted at #1 and doing so REPEATEDLY, every couple years or so such that it’s actually surprising for anything to hit #30, let alone #50 or up, it’s NOT special, and I for one have less faith in a series’ longevity now than ever before: if a book has lasted 120+ issues, that’s a 10-year run, a 10-year history or pedigree, it means that whatever they’re doing with it, it has lasted a decade or more, and isn’t just some short year-and-a-half flash-in-the-pan thing likely to disappear within a “few” months of me getting involved.

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More of the Same: Captain America #1

Captain America #1 came out this week. Didn’t blow me away, didn’t suck…but just came off as more of the same to me. Nothing special.

But then, it’s JUST a Captain America #1. 5th one I’ve picked up, just in MY time as a comics person.

I mean…1996? 1998? 2002? 2005? I guess this newest one was a couple years late in the coming.

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cap2002  cap2004

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A quick 2nd-to-last week of 2010 comics rundown

deadpool30 While making my usual trip to the comic shop during lunch on Wednesday, I–along with my pull-list books–bought a small stack of old Archies to give coworkers in place of Christmas cards.

The next day, I wound up at another comic shop in search of Vertigo Resurrected: Shoot (which I should have picked up several weeks ago when I saw it at a friend’s local shop in Michigan). After rejecting several cool/interesting-looking Marvel books due to the $3.99 price (I’ve lost track of how many sales Marvel has missed out from me on impulse sales alone, for that $3.99 point killing any impulse). I spotted Deadpool #30 and saw that it was a tie-in to the just-wrapped Curse of the Mutants story from X-Men.

Seeing the cover—DP’s grin and the label “Vampire Hickey”—was sufficiently amusing as to draw me in. And the book remaining at the $2.99 price point was enough to get an impulse sale there. (Not too thrilled that this 2-parter begins the same week the main story ended, though).

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