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Deadpool: Merc With a Mouth #12 [Review]

Writer: Victor Gischler
Pencils: Bong Dazo
Inks: Jose Pimentel
Colors: Matt Mills
Letters: Jeff Eckleberry
Cover: Arthur Suydam
Production: Taylor Esposito
Asst. Editor: Sebastian Girner
Editor: Axel Alonso
Published by: Marvel Comics

Deadpool and the gang find themselves in a bit of a race–both literal and figurative–to get back to the chopper and get to the portal so they can go home. While Deadpool’s group deals with their immeediate threat of Zombie Prof. Veronica, the surviving AIM agents plot how to get home, since they need Deadpool as well. When the groups converge, negotiations are had, a deal struck, and things still don’t really go according to plan…but then, Deadpool’s involved. What plan can really be had for things to go according to?

The art has a cartooney yet modern flair to it. The characters are pretty distinct, and it’s not hard to follow the action. Nothing much really stands out, as even the gorier parts fit within the atmosphere of the story. As with any character interpreted by multiple artists across different books, Deadpool’s got a mildly different appearance here than in other books–it in no way takes away from the character, but the style may not entirely fit one’s personal tastes. I do prefer other takes on the character slightly more, but this is not a bad look for the character. The zombies look properly creepy and messaged up…and as a whole, the art does fit itself with the story.

While I referenced above the idea of things not going according to plan where Deadpool’s involved, the writing does show a plan that stretches beyond just a single arc. While there was a distinct split-point, this arc specifically builds on elements from the opening arc. I’m not sure I’d read anything by Gischler a year ago, but he has quickly become my favorite Deadpool writer, capturing the chaotic, whimsical nature of the character (and the multiple voices) while building a relatively long-term story within a couple of smaller arcs.

Though this was begun as an ongoing series and has since been retroactively deemed a 13-issue limited series (something I’m not thrilled with)…this issue actually feels like a penultimate chapter of something big…and taking prior issues along with this, I would hope there’d be an oversized single-volume hardcover for this series.

If you’ve been following the series so far, this is certainly worth picking up. However, at issue 12 of 13, if you’ve not been following along, I’d recommend holding out for a collected volume.

Story: 7/10
Art: 8/10
Overall: 7.5/10

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Deadpool: Merc With a Mouth #7 [Review]

Writer: Victor Gischler
Art: Bong Dazo, Jose Pimentel, Matt Milla, Kyle Baker, Rob Liefeld, Das Pastoras
Letters: Jeff Eckleberry
Cover: Arthur Suydam
Production: Rev. Paul Acerios
Asst. Editor: Sebastian Girner
Editor: Axel Alonso

Since the announcement of the Deadpool Corps mini-event some time back, I’ve looked forward to this issue, as it promised to set things up for that, introducing (in particular) Lady Deadpool. Does it measure up to expectation? Hate to say it, but…nope.

Issue 6 pretty much wrapped up the first arc, as a dimensional portal was open, and Deadpool was set to follow “Headpool” to see that the zombie head was returned “home.” This issue follows the two on their journey (leaving Dr. Betty behind). First, the duo meats “Major Deadpool,” that reality’s Deadpool. Of course, fighting ensues, particularly when Deadpool discovers this counterpart is NOT scarred and in general the ugly specimen he is. Leaving that world behind, Deadpool and Headpool next make the acquaintance of Lady Deadpool–obviously a female counterpart. After a fairly disturbing scene, we’re off to yet another world–where a Western feel is to be had, and The Deadpool Kid is encountered. Finally, the journey concludes with the arrival of someone whose presence signifies something big about to go down.

The art for this extra-sized issue is shared, with different creative talent covering each “world.” The art for the Major Deadpool segment is decent, but something sorta out there about it–it simply LOOKS like it was computer-edited, with a combination of art styles being forced together. The Lady Deadpool segment features art by Liefeld, and gives off mixed vibes. Deadpool and Lady Deadpool–in costume–work quite well here visually. The other characters…well, the visual style doesn’t work quite so well for me. The Deadpool Kid segment reminds me of early issues of the current Cable series, and while it isn’t bad, also somehow doesn’t seem to quite “fit.” The framing sequence seems to be the best of the book, visually, and seems the most “traditional” in style.

Despite the overall not-so-thrilled sentiment regarding the book’s visuals, I do like the conceit. Rather than simply having a myriad of talent on the book, having each creative team cover a specific alternate reality allows the differences in art styles to give each reality a distinction from the others.

Story-wise, this seems little more than an excuse to introduce the alternate Deadpools–the issue both starts and finishes at the same point, albeit the addition of the character appearing on the last page. While those characters are introduced, the story itself is not moved forward in any meaningful way. The introduction of three new characters AND their surroundings doesn’t allow for a whole lot of depth–but there’s a lot of potential here…especially with knowledge that these characters are slated to star in the Deadpool Corps stuff in a couple months.

This issue is “extra sized”–don’t let yourself be fooled by any claims that it is “double sized.” The issue is also $3.99 compared to the usual $2.99 for this series, accounting for the extra pages…but I’m not convinced it was worth it.

On the whole, a rather disappointing issue, that I really can’t recommend to new readers, or those planning to dive into the Deadpool Corps stuff, as this likely is basically a prologue or prequel or whatever that comes before the actual series.

Story: 4/10
Art: 6/10
Overall: 5/10

Deadpool: Merc With a Mouth #4 [Review]

Writer: Victor Gischler
Pencils: Bong Dazo
Inks: Jose Pimentel
Colors: Matt Milla
Letters: Jeff Eckleberry
Production: Rev. Paul Acerios
Asst Editor: Sebastian Girner
Editor: Axel Alonso
Cover: Arthur Suydam
Publisher: Marvel Comcis

Though not what I’d typical consider my usual fare for comics…there’s something about the over-the-top situation and visuals the character winds up in that just makes this a fun read. Though the story takes place pretty much in context of a current Marvel Universe, it sits on an edge just slightly off from most of the other books.

Whether it’s something outrageous like a zombie Tyrannosaur, to the cheesecake Dr. Betty, to the wisecracking Deadpool himself, this story takes established characters and concepts (AIM, Hydra, etc.) and sets them just on the other side of “fantastic” from “comic book realistic.”

The cover scheme for this book has also been fun–rather than just another logo or standard cover design, the title’s been presented in different fonts, as the covers have been “Deadpool-ization” of other classic images in our popular culture (much the same way Suydam’s original Marvel Zombies covers were “zombified” takes on classic Marvel covers. Even the intro/recap page for this title has been fun, changing things up a bit.

We continue following Deadpool, Dr. Betty, and zombie-Deadpool’s head as AIM and Hydra vie for the “bioweapon” the head represents by way of the zombie virus. One needn’t even be all that familiar with these fictional organizations…just that both involve loads of generic footsoldiers, goofy costumes, and all that…with the smarter folks at the head of the organization. Deadpool deals with the zombified Tyrannosaur, and has what I consider a classic slapstick sorta response in one panel that put me immediately in mind of old cartoons I used to watch as a kid. It was predictable, I totally saw it coming…and while predictable isn’t always good, it felt just right as it was used here.

The issue’s art has a nice balance wherein it’s not terribly realistic (too much realism would totally spoil the feel of the story) and yet it avoids feeling too “cartooney.” The art seems a great fit for the story…and the way Deadpool saw the Tyrannosaur was quite amusing.

The cover is labeled with a “parental advisory,” for good reason. The violence and gore, and PG-13 clothing on Dr. Betty, and a bit of coarse language certainly make this something to avoid providing to the younger crowd.

I have near-zero interest in any of the rest of the Marvel Universe these days…but this little “family” of titles focusing on Deadpool have been reminding me that it’s not the characters or the universe that disinterests me as much as a lack of genuinely enjoyable and amusing stories.

While the main Deadpool title has been very good, this just carries a different level of fun and adventure that makes it my favorite of the two titles…at least for now. (And it remains to be seen how Deadpool Team-Up will hold against the main title and this one).

You don’t need to be reading any other titles to follow what’s going on here–you don’t even have to be following the main Deadpool title. That has its story rooted within current Marvel Event Continuity, while this title has its own self-contained story set in the Marvel Universe but not hampered by the ongoing Event Continuity.

Story: 7/10
Art: 8/10
Whole: 8/10

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