• September 2019
    S M T W T F S
    « Aug    
    1234567
    891011121314
    15161718192021
    22232425262728
    2930  
  • On Facebook

  • Archives

  • Categories

  • Comic Blog Elite

    Comic Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory

  • Advertisements

Faces of Evil: Prometheus #1 [Review]

Quick Rating: Good
Story Title: The Man who Murdered Prometheus

The true Prometheus finds himself free, and seeks revenge on the man who has used his name during his imprisonment.

facesofevilprometheus001Writer: Sterling Gates
Art & Color: Federico Dallocchio
Letterer: Swands
Editors: Adam Schlagman & Eddie Berganza
Cover: Mauro Cascioli
Publisher: DC Comics

Opening with a fairly "classic" "one punch takeout" by Batman, we see the original Prometheus dealt with by Batman and Martian Manhunter in a flashback. Moving to the present, we find that Prometheus has been imprisoned for a couple years (comic time), and isn’t seen as much of a threat by the guards assigned him. Prometheus recalls his own origin (a simple story device/excuse to fill readers in on it). When he finds himself let loose of the Martian Manhunter’s control (J’onn’s death in Final Crisis #1 / Final Crisis: Requiem), he sets out to continue his mission of revenge against agents of justice as well as against the imposter using his name of late.

I was interested in this issue by its title alone: I vaguely recalled Prometheus from a couple of issues fairly early in the Morrison JLA run over a decade back, and thought it’d be interesting to see where the character is–or would be brought–in the present. Story wise, I was not disappointed. The plot is a bit cliched, but works for me as a one-shot though I doubt it’d work for me as a longer story. We have a reconciliation of sorts of the character (I never knew that someone other than one character has used the name "Prometheus" in DC’s continuity) that sets him up to be a big player in future issues.

Offhand I am not at all familiar with the artist’s name, but with art like that in this issue, I certainly hope to become familiar. There’s a gritty realism to the art that fits quite well with the story. I’m not a huge fan of the Prometheus costume–can’t quite put my finger on it, except it just looks…weird. I don’t have any old issues to reference to see how similar or different it is to the original, but hey…whatever.

I haven’t found the Faces of Evil bit all that engaging in most of the other DC titles (particularly Booster Gold, Green Lantern Corps, and Action Comics) so far. However, this issue seems to be exactly what Faces of Evil is all about, giving a solid, full story about a villain with insight into the villain him/herself. With quality like this, I’d even be somewhat interested in a regular series of spotlights on various villains if it kept to this price point.

This is a good one-shot–though it’s not an entirely new character, one can certainly see how this’ll be a launching point for a dangerous DC villain that hasn’t had much play time the last few years. If you can find it for cover price, this is well worth a look-see.

Ratings:

Story: 4/5
Art: 3.5/5
Overall: 3.5/5

Advertisements

Faces of Evil: Deathstroke #1 [Review]

Quick Rating: Very Good
Story Title: Faces of Evil: Deathstroke

After suffering a humiliating defeat, Deathstroke takes stock of his life and makes plans for moving forward.

facesofevildeathstroke001 Writer: David Hine
Penciller: Georges Jeanty
Inker: Mark McKenna
Colorist: Jo Smith
Letterer: Pat Brosseau
Assistant Editor: Janelle Siegel
Editor: Michael Marts
Cover: Ladronn
Publisher: DC Comics

Last I recall seeing Deathstroke was in the Last Will and Testament special last Fall, when Deathstroke was defeated in combat by Geoforce. After that humiliating defeat, Deathstroke has had some time to recover, and to take stock of his life. This issue opens with him in the hospital–where those attending to him marvel at his very survival. Once he’s awake, Deathstroke arranges a meeting with his daughter, and the two deal with "family issues" they have with one another. Finally, we see Deathstroke beginning to set up what may be his new status quo.

Hine seems to get this character quite well. The story here is believeable and well within what I’d expect of the character despite my limited exposure to him. We have a man who’s been pushed to his limit and forced to reassess what he is going to do with his life. We get to see him contemplative and in action, see what makes him very dangerous.

The art is solid, too. No complaints here–everything’s nice and clear, with no problems following the action. There’s a slight change in the coloring for a flashback scene that sets that sequence apart from the rest of the issue–gives it a bit of a surreal effect without going hokey or cheesey on us.

Next to Meltzer‘s writing of this character in Identity Crisis and Last Will, this has to be the best depiction I’ve seen of Deathstroke. This issue is–at standard cover price, even!–well worth snagging if you’ve any interest in Deathstroke. And if you’ve never dealt with the character before, you could probably still quite enjoy this issue, as it deals with the here-and-now of the title character as he prepares for what he is going to do moving forward from here.

Ratings:

Story: 4/5
Art: 3.5/5
Overall: 4/5

Batman #685 [Review]

Catspaw

Writer: Paul Dini
Penciller: Dustin Nguyen
Inker: Derek Fridolfs
Colors: Guy Major
Letters: John J. Hill
Asst. Editor: Janelle Siegel
Editor: Mike Marts
Cover: Alex Ross
Publisher: DC Comics

Having thrown a wrench into Hush’s plans, Catwoman gains some small measure of revenge on the man who so horribly wronged her recently. However, in her own machinations she has need of the man who would impersonate Bruce Wayne. After explaining to Hush what role he’ll play, we see the plan set in motion, but with a nice twist at the end that is very fitting.

Dini’s story continues here, in the conclusion of another two-parter begun in Detective and concluded in Batman. This filler has much more significance, though, while also nicely playing with the Faces of Evil theme, and in a post-Batman Batman world. Nothing bad to say about the writing.

I’m not a huge fan of Nguyen’s style on the art, but it works here, and has a good consistency to it. It doesn’t blow me away, but it fits with the story and isn’t bad.

All in all, a solid issue that seems to set the stage for Hush’s status quo of present.

Worthwhile, but probably not essential.

Story: 8/10
Art: 7/10
Whole: 7.5/10

Justice Society of America #23 [Review]

Between a Rock and a Hard Place part one: The Power of Shazam

Story: Geoff Johns & Jerry Ordway
Pencil art: Jerry Ordway
Ink art: Bob Wiacek
Colors: Hi-Fi
Letters: Rob Leigh
Assistant Editor: Harvey Richards
Editor: Michael Siglain
Cover: Alex Ross (variant by Jerry Ordway)
Publisher: DC Comics

Having survived the Gog ordeal, the team finds itself picking up the pieces left behind. We see Hawkman reprimanded for initiating a divide in the team, as well as seeing where several of the characters are at present, post-Gog. The latter part of the issue focuses on the Marvel family in its current incarnation, and sees Isis returned to her husband a changed woman, and the stage set for much trouble to come.

Given the emphasis on the Marvel family, it’s great to see Ordway involved with the writing alongside regular series writer Johns. Together, they compose a story that is quite compelling and interesting–and despite coming off a year-long saga, this issue is fresh and interesting, dealing with ramifications while also ramping up the new story in a great blend of the two points. Though I’ve not read The Trials of Shazam nor The Power of Shazam, I have no real trouble following along–and am actually interested just from this issue in tracking those down to read.

The art is quite good…I enjoy it in and of itself, as well as for the fact that Ordway’s had a significant hand in the Marvel family in earlier stories and thus is a very appropriate artist to take things on now.

As the first issue in a new arc, this is a great point to jump on to check this series out…and honestly, if you’re not reading this series, you should be. If you enjoyed Black Adam in 52 or elsewhere the last few years, and have any interest in the character, this is not an issue to skip.

Story: 9/10
Art: 9/10
Whole: 9/10

Wonder Woman #28 [Review]

Rise of the Olympian part three: Blood of the Stag

Writer: Gail Simone
Penciller: Aaron Lopresti
Inker: Matt Ryan
Colorist: Brad Anderson
Letterer: Steve Wands
Associate Editor: Sean Ryan
Editor: Matt Idelson
Cover: Aaron Lopresti & Hi-Fi (variant by Cary Nord & Hi-Fi)
Publisher: DC Comics

Having been badly hurt in combat with Genocide, Wonder Woman–Diana–has to face Tom in her weakened state, armored up for a battle she feels she must face as her own responsibility. As the JLA doesn’t fare well against Genocide, Wonder Woman, Donna Troy, and Wonder Girl (re)join the battle. Meanwhile, Zeus & co. set their own plans into motion.

I’m still not all that familiar with Wonder Woman, having gotten in only at the very end of the last series, and not really jumping into this series until a month ago. However, I’m finding the basic story easy to follow, and the depiction of the characters to be quite well-done for what little I know of them–and at the least, they’re interesting and I’m still hooked, wanting to know more. Simone seems to be breathing life into a character that often has not seemed all that important nor complex…showing that she really is important and does have complexity.

The art is good, and I have no complaints with it, really. It has a classic sorta look to it, somehow reminding me just a bit of the late 1980s series, while maintaining its feel as a current, contemporary style.

This is only my third issue of this round of following the character, but I’m following along just fine. If you can locate the first couple chapters of this story, it’s well worth jumping on-board for! If you’ve read those issues, this issue gives no reason to stop. My only real complaint with the issue is a quibble at most–Cheetah doesn’t play a large role nor is she the focal point of the issue despite the Faces of Evil focus.

Very much recommended.

Story: 8/10
Art: 8.5/10
Whole: 8.5/10

Superman #684 [Review]

The Mind of Rudy Jones

Writer: James Robinson
Artist: Jesus Merino
Colorist: David Curiel
Letterer: John J. Hill
Asst. Editor: Wil Moss
Editor: Matt Idelson
Cover: Alex Ross
Publisher: DC Comics

This issue works quite well with DC’s Faces of Evil concept. The Parasite is the focal point going in, and we see how much trouble he causes upon release from the Phantom Zone. After that battle, we see the Guardian unmask to his coworkers with the Science Police, Nightwing and Flamebird share a moment with Jay Garrick, and finally Superman visits New Krypton where his aunt reveals something quite disturbing to him.

I’m not quite sure about the green “triangle number” 12 on this cover (I don’t remember an 11, and thought New Krypton was over with as far as the official titled story). That said, this story provides some nice epilogue-type material to that story, showing that just because the official arc is over, the events unleashed don’t tie up so nice-and-neat. Given that, I have no real problem with the story, and it’s really actually nice seeing stuff continue/build from the previous story instead of simply starting fresh as if everything’s always simply been the way it is and no reference to a previous arc.

The art is pretty good, though nothing spectacular. I realize here that compared to the previous issue’s artist, I really like this art, and it depicts the characters in a style that fits what I expect visually.

This issue seems to be a middle-ground issue, not really kicking off a new arc, but not completely belonging with the previous. While much of its content would be far more appreciated with having read New Krypton already, one could probably enjoy this issue fairly well without that context.

All in all a good issue, worth reading if you’re interested in current goings-on in the Superman family of books.

Story: 8/10
Art: 7/10
Whole: 7.5/10

Green Lantern #37 [Review]

Full review posted to comixtreme.com.

%d bloggers like this: