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Ender’s Game: Battle School #4 [Review]

Creative Director & Executive Director Orson Scott Card
Script: Christopher Yost
Art: Pasqual Ferry
Color Art: Frank D’Armata
Lettering: VC’s Cory Petit
Story Consultant: Jake Black
Pasqual Ferry & Frank D’Armata:
Publisher: Marvel Comics

Beginning this issue, I feel like I’ve missed something. I’m not sure if I simply missed an issue…or if there was a story jump that’s alluded to in the opening text, or what–but I found myself wishing there was a bit of a recap page for this issue. I’ve read the novel this is based on, so know what’s happened…just no memory of seeing everything in this visual format.

We pick up with Ender having been transferred out of Bonzo’s army and into another army, which opens up different dynamics between Ender and the other kids. We move through the incident of the younger kids getting away from the larger bullies in the battle room, and finally to where Ender–in the computer simulation game–throws the snake through the mirror and is set upon by many smaller snakes.

On the whole, the art continues to be good and fairly stylistic. The visuals are different than what I have in my head for these events, but I can let that slide with no real trouble.

The story holds up as well–though again, I’ve read the novel and so can fill in any gaps that I’d otherwise find myself missing. This definitely continues to feel–both visually and the story–like an adaptation. Yost and Ferry do a good job of holding to the spirit of the source material, though, which is indeed a plus in that department.

For the point of the story we’re at 4 issues in out of 5, I can only assume that we are indeed going to hve a series of mini-series adapting the entirety of Ender’s Game. However, I wonder at the same time if we might get a longer series combining both Ender and Bean for the next segment, as it seems likely that this mini will end not long after the two are introduced.

If you’re not already familiar with Ender’s Game or interested in beginning with something that is an “adaptation of” the work, this probably isn’t for you–especially for the price. Otherwise, this isn’t bad, and one could do much worse than revisit the story in this format.

Story: 7/10
Art: 7/10
Whole: 7/10

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Ender’s Game: Battle School #2 [Review]

Creative Director & Executive Director: Orson Scott Card
Script: Christopher Yost
Art: Pasqual Ferry
Color Art: Frank D’Armata
Lettering: VC’s Cory Petit
Story Consultant: Jake Black
Cover: Pasqual Ferry & Frank D’Armata
Publisher: Marvel Comics

Picking up where the previous issue left off, we see Ender’s trip to and arrival at Battle School. His teacher lays it on a bit hard, intentionally (and effectively) isolating Ender from his fellow students from the get-go…the hope being this will prevent Ender from getting comfortable, and force him to think outside the standard “system.” We see Ender’s craftiness as he quickly engages older students, proving himself worthy of their level…we also see Ender’s skill in the Battle Room, easily adapting to a zero-gravity situation other students have a harder time with.

The story seems quite true to the book as I recall reading. Whether this holds up under close/immediate comparison I’m not sure. I find it to be quite satisfactory, though. The concepts Card presents work well in present-day American culture where we’ve got a war going on a couple of fronts and non-traditional enemies abound…and military advances seem to be pushing the bounds of traditional practices. While obviously set in the future, the story has that charming relevance in present-day.

After the first issue, the visual style’s growing on me a bit–it’s still not what I initially imagined when I’d read Ender’s Game years ago…but it fits, and it’s not hard to let this visual take influence my memories. There’s a certain vibe to the art that I can’t quite put my finger on…sort of a manga influence while seeming like it’s trying to fit a live model for certain characters.

On the whole, not a bad issue. As an adaptation this holds my interest–a sort of re-reading of the familiar story, but with pictures replacing thousands of words.

I’m not entirely sure why I bought this issue…this is a 5-issue limited series, and I would be absolutely shocked if the collected-volume (aka “graphic novel”) isn’t available within a month or two of the final issue’s shipping. You’re probably better off waiting for that version, unless you’re absolutely chomping at the bit for a visual production of Ender’s Game.

Story: 7/10
Art: 7/10
Whole: 7/10

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