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New DuckTales Toys in Target!

The other day, I was clued in that there is a new line of DuckTales toys at Target!

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I zipped out intending to get several. The first location did not yet have them out–an employee suggested they had them "in" but didn’t know when they’d be "put out." (this, despite the Target site AND app both saying they were "in stock"–something I’d take as meaning shelved and available for walk-ins).

So I went to another nearby Target where I had some actual success!

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Of course, it wouldn’t be DuckTales without Scrooge McDuck himself!

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And then, following behind, other primary characters like Huey and Dewey…

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Also Louie and Webby, rounding out "the kids" (how did I get old enough for that phrasing to seem most appropriate?)

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The single-figure cards were $8.99, while the two-packs of the kids were $12.99.

I also saw the single-card Donald Duck and Flintheart Glomgold, but passed on them, only having so much to spend. I do intend to get those eventually, assuming these are not a one-shot flash-in-the-pan for the store.

There are also a couple of "playsets"–the Suncatcher (plane) that comes with Launchpad McQuack (I suspect but have not confirmed it as the ONLY way to get the character, but I did not see a single-figure card for him!). There’s also some sort of Money-Bin playset.

And while not part of this line, there’s a HUGE Pop figure–like a "statuette"–of Scrooge on a pile of coins from his Money-Bin.

I also saw a pack of "inaction" figures with most of the key characters, and they had the first two graphic novels from IDW on the endcap as well. There was also a box/pile of talking plush characters, and though I didn’t see them, something for what I believe is a set of blind-pack figures.

All in all…a nice-size roll-out for a line of toys based on an excellent cartoon!

I have GOT to get caught up…they "lost" me last year with their HUGE hiatus, and I’ve yet to get back to the show since (and the DVR didn’t pick up any of the newer episodes, so I suspect the usual random quackery going on that seems to plague ALL cartoons I try to keep up with).

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DuckTales #1 [Review]

Full review posted to cxPulp.com.

Story: 4/5
Art: 4/5
Overall: 4.5/5

Uncle Scrooge #400 [Review]


Full review posted to cxPulp.com
.

 

Story: 4/5
Art: 4/5
Overall: 4.5/5

Uncle Scrooge #394 [Review]

Full review posted to cxPulp.com.

Story: 2.5/5
Art: 3.5/5
Overall: 3/5

DuckTales & Darkwing Duck are back

I was largely introduced to Uncle Scrooge and much of the comics versions of Disney characters by checking ’em out after noticing a string of highly positive reviews by Blake Petit (of comixtreme.com and evertimerealms.com) more than half a decade ago.

Though I dabbled briefly in buying some of the newer comics as they were released, the ridiculous price ($8/issue!) Gemstone was charging for the books being geared toward collectors instead of readers quickly drove me away from the monthly releases. I did, however, pick up a couple of TPBs of Carl Barks’ Greatest DuckTales Stories (originally published in the Uncle Scrooge title, that later served as the basis for episodes of the cartoon), The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck, and a couple other books that were quite enjoyable.

So when Boom Studios got the license to the classic Disney books, to publish through their Boom Kids imprint, I checked ’em all out on principle: $2.99 was not at all bad for giving things a look-see compared to the $8 price that one would have to be pretty darned committed to a title to pay.

I did quickly back off on the single issues of both the classic Disney books and the newer Disney/Pixar properties (particularly The Incredibles) in favor of collected volumes.

This month, though, has undone my intentions there, at least as the classic Disney stuff goes.

For a few months, at least, we have the return of DuckTales in Uncle Scrooge (the first issue of this, at least, was highly enjoyable) and in what has since been “upgraded” to an ongoing series from mini-series status the return of possibly my favorite Disney character, Darkwing Duck.

I expect DuckTales to make for a very enjoyable read in collected-edition format, and same for Darkwing Duck (and with a story title of The Duck Knight Returns and an inside-cover/title-page image in homage to the classic Batman: The Dark Knight Returns…I would absolutely buy a collected edition if they use that as the cover!)

But in the meantime, after nearly missing the first issues of both the DuckTales run (in Uncle Scrooge #392) and Darkwing Duck‘s premiere…both titles have now become the “core” of what I’m on the verge of making a full-blown pull-list at the local comic shop I’ve been frequenting for the last 2 1/2 years.

I suppose that makes both these titles a success, as Boom has drawn me back to the single issues rather than simply “waiting for the trade,” and in Darkwing Duck‘s case, might even result in what would basically be a “double purchase” of the first arc, at least.

If you’ve checked out neither of these, I would recommend tracking them down if your local comic shop still has ’em. And if not…keep an eye out for the inevitable collected editions, as both titles are an excellent read. These classic properties from childhood are back and better than ever!

The Rest of the Stack: Two Weeks of Other Books I’ve Read

Due to hitting the busy season at work, I basically took a week off from reviewing. With the Thanksgiving holiday, I’ve had a chance to catch up a bit. As usual, these are mini/”capsule” reviews of books I picked up but am not writing out a full review for. This post is double-sized due to covering TWO weeks’ worth of books.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Color Special #1
This issue’s a real treat. For the same price as a black-and-white issue of Tales of the TMNT, the issue is full-color. Best of all, it’s the classic #1 issue, now in color for the first time as a comic. (It’s been colorized at least once before, in the First graphic novel Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Book I). The coloring looks quite natural, and it would have been awesome to see the original series re-issued in color…or at least, the first ten issues, the one-shots for each turtle, and Return to New York. For that matter, City at War as well. As-is, at the very least, this is a nice version of #1 to add to one’s collection without breaking the bank. Highly recommended for any TMNT fan, or anyone curious as to how the turtles’ story got started.

Deadpool: Merc With a Mouth #5
This issue continues the story of Deadpool, Zombie-head Deadpool and Dr. Betty facing Hydra agents trying to kill them to get the head themselves. A bit of cheesecake art to the issue, but that can be overlooked for an excellent scene in which Deadpool and Bill (not Bob–he insists he’s Bill, though Deadpool can’t seem to really tell the difference from his old buddy) have an exchange over the Star Wars series of movies. Suffice to say that reading this, one knows exactly where Deadpool stands regarding the trilogies. Overall another fun issue. I’m pretty sure the story wraps with issue 6, so at this point if you aren’t already following the book or able to get the first few issues, you’re probably just as well to wait for a collected edition. The story so far definitely seems well worthwhile for Deadpool fans, whichever way the story’s read.

Supergirl #47
This issue provides a good deal of backstory to Alura, and her courtship by Zor-El. We also see the character FINALLY acting out of real motivation that can be understood, instead of just coming off as a near-villainous witch of a character. Reactron is put on trial, and Alura is determined that he will be tried justly and not simply killed out of vengeance-seeking. Unfortunately, her fellow New Kryptonians don’t all share the sentiment, leading to some interesting character development. Though Supergirl is present in these pages, this is very much Alura’s story, with her daughter playing a minor role. The end of the issue has an interesting (in a way) revelation that does seem par for the course. Not a bad issue, but not wonderful. If you’re already following the title and/or the over-arching story in the Super-books, this’ll be just fine. It’s not really an issue to entice new readers, I don’t think. Not sure if it’s significant or just an oversight on someone’s part, but the cover lacks the “World Against Superman” banner the titles have been carrying lately, though this retains the red-shield numbering begun with August’s Codename: Patriot arc.

Flash: Rebirth #5
I’m pretty sure this started out as a 5-issue mini-series…I recall it seeming slightly “off” as I recalled Green Lantern: Rebirth being 6, and thinking the two ought to be pretty much the same length. This issue sees all the various speedsters team up, as well as a development that presumably “solves” whatever issue it was Wally’s kids were having with their powers…and we seem to have a new Impulse (given Bart gave up the identity to become Kid Flash back in 2003). This continues the “legacy” aspect of the Flash line. There’s a revelation that affects Barry’s past…as well as a very specific threat to his past. This is a sorta interesting issue, but on the whole, continues to be more “miss” than “hit” for me. GL: Rebirth dispelled my unease toward returning a long-dead character to an old status quo and really set up a great new status quo that worked everyone into the mix. This Flash: Rebirth has not at all sold me on any “WHY” Barry needs to be back, and simply puts things logically into place to ALLOW for the character being back, and incorporating pretty much everything else involving the Flash family of characters. Recommended if you’ve already invested in the first 4 issues of the series.

Uncle Scrooge #385
It’s great to be able to pick up this series now. I’d bought maybe 3 issues several years ago while it was being put out by Gemstone, but simply could not justify the $8 per issue, even if it was squarebound and double-ish-sized. This issue is fairly low-key, picking up from the previous issue. Scrooge, Donald, and the nephews continue to deal with Magica as she tries for Scrooge’s Number One Dime. Once things are wrapped up at the mine, Scrooge & Co. wind up looking for sunken treasure, and dealing with Magica AND the Beagle Boys. While not the greatest of comics, this is still a good, fun issue, and well worth getting if you’ve any interest in these characters.

Archie #603
The “Wedding Story” has taken a twist I didn’t expect: rather than being a 6-part exploration of Archie marrying Veronica, after 3 issues of that the story has switched to give us the story of what would happen if Archie married Betty instead. I’m really enjoying this “longform” story that not only takes more than a page to tell, but multiple issues. I’ve picked up the occasional Archie book through the years…but with stories like this, I might just stick around on a monthly basis.

Superman #694
This issue sees Mon-El’s “official” return to action as he re-reveals himself to the people who’ve thought him dead for awhile. This also debuts the “new” costume…which honestly seems a non-issue to me, despite the big deal being made of it. On the whole, it looks to me like the only difference is that Mon-El is now sporting a small “S-shield,” as he’s holding Superman’s place…and Blue shorts to contrast with the red costume (sort of a reverse-Superman color scheme). Probably the best part of the issue is the interaction with Connor and Ma, showing that Mon has a place within the Superman family of characters.

Image United #1
I have mixed feelings on this book. For one thing, something of this scale ought to have a huge multi-panel fold-out cover, such that all the primary characters are spotlighted…instead of one having to choose one of six segments of the picture as the cover to purchase. I chose the Savage Dragon segment, that character long being one of my favorite characters that I rarely read, though the Spawn cover was cool, too. The “jam session” of having each character’s creator doing that character’s visuals is a very cool thing, and a different take on doing a crossover project. The story itself seems to be a slow build and full of little but action (presumably to show off the blending of the different art styles). Being familiar with these characters for the past 16-17 years, the blended style worked well, and nothing really seemed all that jarring. Since this will surely be collected into a single volume eventually and my proclivity toward this type of variant/alternate covers…I’ll probably pass on the subsequent issues and snag the collected volume when that comes out, if I still have enough interest.

Son of Marvel Reading Chronology
This is one of those freebies that Marvel puts out on occasion, to try to hook one on buying more product. While I prefer the “Saga” issues (they’re free, and take far, far longer to read than any other single comics, and fill me in on stuff so I know what’s up overall without having to keep up on Marvel’s output in general), this guide is rather informative, showing what volumes are out there, in-print…and what they collect. As well as, of course, the order to read them for a chronological reading experience in-continuity. If nothing else, this has informed me that there are currently 10 hardcovers collecting Ultimate Spider-Man, so I know there are only 5 left that I want to try to track down. This is definitely a worthwhile guide if you can find it and not have to pay for it…or at least, please don’t pay much for it, as It is SUPPOSED to be FREE.

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