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The ’80s Revisited: The Flash (1987) #1

flash(1987)_0001Flash

Writer: Mike Baron
Penciller: Jackson Guice
Inker: Larry Mahlstedt
Letterer: Steve Haynie
Colorist: Carl Gafford
Editor: Mike Gold
Published by: DC Comics
Cover Date: June, 1987
Cover Price: 75 Cents

I’ve been quite aware of The Flash–particularly Wally–since my initial foray into comics back in 1989/1990…my earliest conscious exposure to the character offhand was Adventures of Superman #463. Mr. Mxyzptlk forced the two to race…and this stands out to me because of the fact of Wally constantly eating, the notion that even with the super-speed, he was still burning calories and all that (to my 8/9 year old self, the simple “have to eat to keep going” was enough). I became more aware of the character with guest-appearances here and there, and the “key” role he played at the start of Zero Hour, and as I learned more about “continuity” and such, I became aware of Barry and generally got to where the Flash was an accepted character for me.

I didn’t start picking up any issues of his actual series on any regular basis, though, until #197 (Geoff Johns, first issue of the Blitz arc) in 2003 or so, and I’ve moved forward from there. I’ve become aware of several creative teams, and it was all the positive “buzz” for Mark Waid‘s run and then the (at the time) up and coming Geoff Johns that eventually led to me trying the series. But outside of maybe a couple issues, I really have never actually gotten (around) to reading Wally’s series, particularly from this period.

So jumping into #1 here rather arbitrarily was definitely an interesting experience.

We open on Wally–now 20–at a convenience store and come to find out he’s marking time before a “surprise” party for his 20th birthday. He’s no longer a teenager (and now being The Flash and not Kid Flash, no longer a “teen” Titan). He’s “graduated” into the role, stepping into the costume previously worn by Barry Allen, and he’s got huge boots to fill. Before the party can really get rolling, Wally receives a phone call: a heart is available for a transplant…in Seattle. And conventional technology cannot get it there in time, so it’s up to Wally to race the heart to the opposite coast. He extracts some conditions, pointing out that he’s doing a favor, and these doctors are getting paid huge sums, but he (Wally) could use medical insurance (wow…30 years ago!) and such…that it’s the principle of the matter. (To say nothing of the fact that he needs the calories for such an extensive trip). Along the way Wally encounters someone who was apparently attacked by Vandal Savage, and witnesses other situations he can’t stop for…but he eventually arrives and the transplant’s a success, and (after 17 hours’ sleep) Wally gets to meet the patient, who conveniently has some knowledge of (at least the rumour of) Vandal Savage. After being returned home (via plane), Wally receives a package…with a heart–and meets Vandal Savage.

I just double-checked…and this issue is “only” 22 pages of story. So much in it, and clear to follow, and it’s all crammed into 22 pages. We meet the main character, and start off on this key day–he’s now The Flash (not Kid Flash), he’s just turned 20; we see him with friends/teammates for context; we get details about who he is, what he is, how he got here, limitations of his powers, etc; we see him in action AS the Flash; clear differences between THIS Flash and his predecessor are highlighted; immediate threats overcome and a new threat set up, and close on the introduction of a “big bad” for the upcoming issues. Basically, this is an excellent sort of first issue!

This issue looks and feels like a mid/late-’80s book…which is quite appropriate. Guice‘s art is top-notch, and I really like it here. The detail may not quite be quite the level of, say, George Perez of this time, but it’s quite good and works very well for me, with all relevant characters looking as I’d expect for my contextual knowledge of the time, they look familiar/recognizable, and the visuals never failed me as to what was going on.

Story-wise, as said, this is an excellent first issue with numerous “bullet points” touched on that I would hope and expect a first issue to do…I genuinely want to read the next issue, such that I find myself thinking I’d willingly buy the next several issues at “full back issue pricing” (up to $2-$3 per) just for the sake of immediacy on getting to read them (or $1.99 for digital; same reasoning).

I really like that we get a concrete age for Wally–I’m not sure how old I’d’ve pegged him by the early 200s (probably mid-20s at least), and concrete ages don’t often seem to be established for characters. While I get that many don’t want to nail characters down or “limit” them that way, I’m one that really likes that sort of detail, even if it comparatively “ages” other characters. I also really like that Wally seems young-ish (I’m in my mid-30s myself!) and I truly get that sense of his just now stepping up into the Flash role–I can “see” the Kid Flash there, essentially “trying on” the “real Flash” costume; he wears it but does not seem particularly comfortable in it. (And I know from other stuff I’ve read ABOUT the series that that’s something that largely continues for a number of years of stories, such that the reader gets to see Wally’s progression to where he truly comes into his own as The Flash).

I enjoyed this issue, and it was honestly a real treat to read. I know I snagged this copy from a quarter bin, and it’s absolutely worth 25 cents, or $1…as a #1 from when such things were treats and rarities, I’d say this would even be well worth getting up to $5ish. As you can get it digitally for about $2, I wouldn’t recommend going much above that, though, unless you’re particularly interested in owning this issue. It’s well worth the $2 to at least read, and I very much look forward to digging up the next few issues, either from my own collection or re-buying in some form for the immediacy.

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Zero Hour Revisited – Flash #94

90srevisited_zerohour

flash_0094Reckless Youth chapter three: Just Do It!

Story: Mark Waid
Guest Pencils: Carlos Pacheco
Inks: Wayne Faucher and Jose Marzan Jr.
Letterer: Kevin Cunningham
Colorist: Gina Going
Assistant Editor: Ruben Diaz
Editor: Brian Augustyn
Published by: DC Comics
Cover Date: September 1994
Cover Price: $1.50

Well, that explains a bit, on multiple fronts. Some early Wally/Bart interaction, as well as (now) confirming [1.] that yes, that was “the” Wally in Zero Hour #4 and [2.] How he wound up in the future with no real context provided.

We open on Bart, with Wally’s narration…Bart’s not familiar with his own power/abilities, and Wally’s job is to keep an eye on him. Iris Allen–Barry’s wife–is present, and plays coy on details of Wally’s future. Meanwhile, Linda’s got a guy named Argus involved in some current investigation (I think he’s the Bloodlines character introduced in the Flash 1993 Annual). Wally’s none too happy about being pressed into responsibility for Bart…and takes full advantage when Argus phones in a tip. Wally investigates,and finds himself about to get some really good intel on Kobra when Bart rushes in, spoiling things. Resigned, Wally joins the fight, but soon finds himself facing Kadabra…and then he’s pulled into the far-future, Kadabra’s own time…and while still trying to get his bearings, Waverider appears.

The credits list Pacheco as a guest penciller…which explains my relative (but only slight) surprise at this not being a Weiringo-drawn issue. Though some panels come off slightly more cartooney than I’d prefer, with an odd sort of simplicity to them, on the whole the issue is quite good-looking, and not bad to see. I can mostly follow stuff, though I’m mentally piecing together context, as this is listed as part 3 of a story, but I’m reading it because it’s a Zero Hour tie-in. We get plenty of linework to suggest Flash’s speed, but nothing special or surprising. I “get” that Flash is fast, but there’s no particular creative styling to suggest the speed in a way that the very layout of the page does it, and the art style in general isn’t something drastically different from other contemporary books. It’s “just” superhero art, works well, and fits the issue.

Story-wise, I’m a bit lost, with not knowing where the story began (if this is part 3, I can assume #92) nor how long it should go (six issues from this would be #100, though there’s the #0 yet between). Similarly, given the tight continuity, I spent most of the issue wondering how Wally’s here doing this stuff when in Zero Hour #4 he’s in the far future, apparently having just captured someone (Kadabra). That does get addressed at the end of this issue, and perhaps my expectations were thrown by the Batman issue: that one shared several pages’ worth of story with Zero Hour #4…this one basically a panel. I’d “assumed” we’d get something a bit more detailed in this issue on Wally’s actions trying to shut down the Time Rift…but apparently that was “uniquely” contained to the Event Book itself.

I’d half thought/assumed over the years that Bart–Impulse–first appeared in Zero Hour itself, that this story shoehorned the character into the Flash mythology…but it would seem that I was wrong…and that has me all the more interested in getting up to speed (no pun intended) with the Flash book. This was a first-time-through for me with this issue…I didn’t read it back in 1994, nor had I ever read it prior to this reading project…so it’s actually rather cool to get this taste of the Flash’s own story, knowing the exact point it’s taking place in relation to a bunch of other ’90s issues…namely, during July 1994, and the Zero Hour event.

As this issue is part of the earliest stage of the story, the Time Anomalies are just being discovered, the wibbly-wobbly-ness just started to get noticed, so the bulk of the issue really IS “just” a typical Flash story, just any issue of the Flash book.

I enjoyed it, and look forward to the #0 issue, and eventually/someday getting fully caught up contextually with Wally’s time as the Flash.

REBIRTH WEEK 3: Titans, Superman, Batman, Green Lanterns, Green Arrow

This is the third week of DC‘s Rebirth initiative…and already the fourth week including the one-shot DC Universe: Rebirth #1. And though so far it’s basically all a ton of #1s on covers…it’s truly the quality of the stories that’s got me so all-in and interested and excited and just simply digging these stories, loving the DC Universe again!

TITANS: REBIRTH #1

titans_rebirth0001I’ve been looking forward to this issue probably more than any of the other Rebirth books. As much as I’d been pulled back into the Superman books with the Final Days of Superman story…the reveal several weeks ago of Wally West and his return was really the tipping point, the selling point, for me on this whole Rebirth thing. It was what pushed me from curiosity into embracing it. And here, we get to see the returned Wally West–formerly Kid Flash, now…something. Flash? In a new costume reminiscent of the Kid Flash outfit but sporting “adult Flash” colors. And while seeking answers, Wally winds up tangling with his old friends…but soon realizes that running away from his problem is no help…tactile contact sparks their memories, restoring Wally to them. By issue’s end, they remember him, know who he is–and they share with him that they’re already on the trail of someone they know messed with their memories…whether this is the same “big bad” Wally is pursuing as well remains to be seen.

I totally “appreciate” the Titans, and Teen Titans…I even followed a run of Teen Titans for several years into Infinite Crisis. But particularly at the New 52, they just failed to hold my interest, and so my enjoying this as much as I did is an extremely welcome thing. Add to that the (to me) “official” reunion image–and Wally realizing he’s home–and this was a highly enjoyable issue!

SUPERMAN #1

superman(2016)_0001I really dug this issue, especially as a #1. Of course, this is a #1 geared for someone like me…even as it provides this starting point, a jump-on point, for new readers. We get to see the title character both in costume and out, as well as meet supporting cast–his wife Lois, his son Jon…even the neighbor’s daughter (surely to be a Lana Lang type figure). There’s even an early double-page spread that in some ways I “ought to” complain about (given my usual complaints about so many double-page spreads being “cheats” and “wastes of space” and all that)…but it just made me grin. I think the first official “shirt rip” as this Clark changes over to Superman to go into action.

What disturbs me about the issue–there’s a scene in which young Jon races off across a field along with the family cat…and he sees the cat snatched up by a bird (a falcon of some kind?)…and we see a display of his as-yet uncontrolled power: Jon lashes out instinctively at the bird with his heat vision…but–lacking control–the blast incinerates bird and cat. The kid is certainly not happy about this–a definite weight of failure on him–but it very definitely broke my heart…ESPECIALLY having imagined the joy at seeing the boy fly, or race after the bird, and rescue the cat. An argument with his parents, perhaps–he HAD TO use his powers, he saved the cat! But instead, in attempting to save the cat…

I’m an easy mark for stuff with fuzzy animals. I am admittedly desensitized to human death in fiction, but even in fiction I can’t not feel something at the loss of an animal…especially like this.

That said…the fact the scene hit me as it did, I can also see so much potential for stuff, and I look forward to more (even as I’ll try to “forget” those particular panels).

The cover, too, looks like a #1, and I’m again glad FOR the “regular” cover actually having an iconic look to it.

BATMAN #1

batman(2016)_0001In a way, I actually was not looking forward to this issue. I don’t know now what I was fully picturing regarding it–something like the Court of Owls, but people embodying the City itself, another “secret society” going after Batman. Seeing Batman leap into action to try to save a plane–or at least minimize catastrophic damage and loss of life when it crashes–was both exciting and a bit over-the-top. I’ve really grown tired of a Batman prepared for anything/everything. But I have to be honest that despite that, it’s still exciting and impressive to see the character in action like this, and to picture it as just some big summer action/blockbuster thriller that’s over the top but right in range of what I’m looking for.

While I certainly had zero expectation of yet another “death of Batman,” it was also–for me–quite effective seeing a Batman really not even phased at facing death. Regretful, perhaps, at unfinished/unfulfilled objectives, but plans in place for such circumstances…and then a mortal moment, wondering if his parents would be proud of him despite his dying. Aaaand then we get a couple of new characters–though for a moment I actually thought they might’ve just crossed over from Superman #1 and felt a thrill of continuity-excitement there. What I got leaves me “interested” and curious, definitely looking forward to the next issue.

And the art? I like this rendition of Batman…it’s slightly “off” but works, and I just simply like it.

GREEN LANTERNS #1

green_lanterns_(2016)_0001This title is a real surprise for me. I can say I definitely “miss” Kyle and Guy, even Hal. But where I was not at all interested in anything with Simon Baz in the “meta” sense several years ago in the hubbub of the character’s original introduction…now that I’m actually reading stuff with him and it’s tempered with another character completely new to me (yet who I can certainly identify with–probably way more than I’d prefer–I’m really enjoying this, and it’s technically only the first issue!

I like the idea of two “rookies” working together…and at least so far am definitely digging the dynamics we get here–the two focal characters vs. the world, vs. each other, and the simmering background developments with the Red Lanterns (whose series I have yet to really read). I don’t know how long my interest will hold, but I’ll definitely get the next issue!

GREEN ARROW #1

green_arrow_(2016)_0001I usually don’t much care for stuff tying in to TV, or feeling like a comic is drawing inspiration from a tv show inspired by the comic. But I haven’t really read much Green Arrow in so long, and a lot of stuff with what I had been reading had gone “downhill” that–the TV show Arrow being my main exposure lately–I rather welcome it. With “the goatee” and fond expressions like “Pretty Bird” being back, I’m cool with other differences and such, and willing to go with the flow, just glad to be on the ride and actually enjoying a book with this title again. I know Seattle had been the characters’ town for quite awhile in the ’80s and such during the Grell run, so even seeing them back there is a bit nostalgic, and yet there’s still a sense of freshness to me.

I actually waffled on the cover for this issue–I really liked the image on a variant, but figured while it was a great image, this one fits both the issue and my expectation better. Though I feel like the end of the issue is just a cheap shot at a clichéd cliffhanger…it actually leaves me curious, wondering at a couple possible directions stuff could be taken, depending on what the writer’s got in store, though the more jarring surprise would seem to fly in the face of this whole initiative. I’m definitely gonna be looking for the next issue, though! (and in the end, THAT is what shows the effectiveness…I’m looking forward to ‘finding out’ regardless of assumption or cliché!).

OVERALL:

These FELT LIKE #1 issues. We’ve had the prologue/#0/ __: Rebirth one-shots to set things up, but just as those felt appropriately like prologue, these feel like true #1 issues. However, they’re not cold-start, from-a-blank-slate #1s. These embrace their new directions, the modified status quo, giving us both beginning AND continuation. It’s been years since I’ve read Green Lantern, even more years since Green Arrow, I have not kept current with Batman, I only just “came back to” Superman a couple months ago, and really haven’t touched Titans or Teen Titans overall since well before the New 52. But I’m back in, I’m following stuff, I’m enjoying the reading, being reunited with characters/concepts I’ve enjoyed in the past and learning of newer ones I’m less–or not at all yet–familiar with.

And I’m truly having a blast, having a larger stack of comics each week that I’m actually eager to read into. Not shift a couple books to read while others go in the “I’ll get to it whenever” pile but actually ordering the issues, eager to read them ALL.

weekly_haul_week_of_20160615d

Thoughts on Rebirth #1, Lois and Clark #8 and Superman #52[SPOILERS]

weekly_haul_week_of_20160525a

I’d been looking forward to these issues for awhile, with way more excitement and interest than I’ve had in most comics in ages.

Please be forewarned, I’m going to spoil these issues here, especially the Rebirth issue!

Superman: Lois and Clark #8

I remember highly anticipating the first issue of this series, due to the prospect of this meager “bone” tossed to me as a fan of the pre-Flashpoint Superman. It’s been a rich series, giving me so much that I’ve wanted, particularly as “my” Superman was now like I remembered the pre-CoIE Earth-2 Superman–not being the focus, not being “the” Superman, there could be hugely major shakeups in the status quo, such as Clark and Lois actually having a (biological) son. There’s the huge, overwhelming (to me) loss of the pre-Flashpoint world they knew…but with stuff in Rebirth I think there’s something to be said/suggested in this Superman sticking around but at least us as readers having “hope” that his world and past and loved ones are still “out there somewhere.”

While the above was more speculative and incomplete, I’ll be “spoiling” Superman #52 below as well as the Rebirth issue after it.

Superman #52

This issue concludes the Super-Leag…er…The Final Days of Superman story that’s crossed the various Super-books for the last few weeks/couple months. I’ve known what was coming, it was part of why I opted to follow the story. Get the story, see the events that lead to the apparent death of the New 52 Superman.

SPOILERS!

I don’t know what I expected, but this was not it. Surely there’s more DEPTH to stuff, things to be explored, subtexts one can root out…but on the surface, on initial reading, reading to get to the end…I felt like this was a letdown.

That’s it?!? That’s how he goes out?

And even with an 8-part story leading into it (remember, 1992’s Doomsday! arc (aka The Death of Superman was 6 chapters plus a Justice League tie-in) that should have made this epic, this felt padded and drawn-out, and while Superman “knew it was coming” this seemed like a weak way for him to go out, despite doing so literally in a “blaze” of glory (and that is NOT intended as a reference to the character Blaze).

Clark–the pre-Flashpoint Superman–steps in, the two DO meet (albeit briefly–and yeah, here’s the selling point that had me buying the #50s…I wanted to see them MEET), and we get an abrupt end to the New 52 Superman, which paves the way for the other Superman to ‘take over’ or ‘step back into his rightful place’ or some such.

The story ultimately doesn’t seem to have had much POINT except to “clear the board” and allow for things to keep moving FORWARD without actually backtracking or saying someone didn’t exist, etc. And that will surely also be coming into play in the next few months of stories.

Below, I SPOIL stuff in the issue, so be forewarned!

DC Universe: Rebirth #1

Now that I’m ready to actually write about this, I’m at a loss for words.

The art was an immediate attention-grabber…it just looked GOOD. And with the likes of Gary Frank, Ethan Van Sciver, Ivan Reis, and so many other “brand name creators”, how could this not? These are The Big Guns, some of THE big names whose art I’ve so enjoyed in the past (over the last 10-15 some years), so seeing their work was a huge treat, and I did not mind the bits of difference between ‘chapters’ and such…I was far, far more interested in the story itself.

And that story takes place across nearly 70 pages, with so many little moments that I really can’t even begin to properly “summarize” it, nor am I going to offer a page by page commentary on the issue.

Suffice it to say, I’m spoiling this issue.

This.

Is.

Your.

Final.

Bit of.

Spoiler.

Space.

To quote one River Song… “Spoilers, Sweetie!”

So…

Wally is BACK. My Wally. Original Wally. Wally West, Wally that was Kid Flash, in the Teen Titans, great friends with Dick Grayson, that became Flash after Barry died in the Crisis on Infinite Earths, Wally that “died” during Zero Hour, Wally that was the focus of more than 226 issues of his own ongoing series, Wally that disappeared and was seemingly–at best–“replaced” to be in line with the then-upcoming/now established tv show.

And he’s brought back in a way, it’s explained such that it does NOT invalidate the New 52 Wally West, it allows both to exist, to co-exist without my having any particular problem with it.

All the hype, and in getting to that, typing that…I’ve realized that THAT was my take-away with this issue.

Wally West is BACK!

Add to that we have some coy setup, more someone behind the scenes of the ones behind the scenes of the ones behind the scenes.

I remember the woman from Flashpoint #5, the ending, when stuff was somewhat supposedly “put right,” she had influence on what became the New 52 including the incorporation of the Wildstorm characters into the main unierse along with elements formerly/primarily Vertigo. Well, this woman–Pandora, I believe–is dealt with, and whatever power she had? She’s minor compared to this other power.

And from Wally’s narration, there’s this concept that 10 years had been “stolen,” that “love” had been stolen, “legacy” had been stolen, that it had all been stolen to make the heroes weaker, prevent them from being capable of taking something on.

Everyone being YOUNGER. A Superman in his early/mid-20s instead of mid-30s, and never married, etc. Barry, with no Legacy; no Jay to Barry to Wally to Bart. A compressed span of time in which Batman went through numerous Robins. Etc and so on and so forth.

And ultimately, to ME, to MY reading, the way I read this, the way I took it to heart…this “salvages” things. This validates the New 52 against pre-Flashpoint DCU. Essentially we have someone messing behind the scenes, manipulating vastly untold powers in ways that affect the very multiverse…and there’s still something COMING.

Continue reading

The ’90s Revisited: The Flash #142

flash0142Get Me to the Church On Time

Writers: Mark Waid, Brian Augustyn
Pencils: Pop Mhan
Inks: Chris Ivy
Letters: Gaspar
Colors: Tom McCraw
Assistant Editor: L.A. Williams
Editor: Paul Kupperberg
Published by: DC Comics
Cover Date: October 1998
Cover Price: $1.99

This is one of those issues whose cover served as an extremely powerful selling point: “The Wedding of The Flash.” OK. I knew Wally and Linda were married…and that it happened SOMETIME before #200, as that was about the time their kids were born, and I was pretty sure they’d been married awhile prior. So spotting this in the quarter bin without any significant “run” to grab, I still figured it would be a good one-off/isolated issue to read.

We open on Wally dealing with Kobra and his crew, and find he’s got a very personal stake in dealing with the current situation: the terrorists are quite inconsiderate, after all, attacking on his wedding day. Linda and Wally put the last-second finishing touches on wedding plans as Linda’s family arrives. While things get into motion for the wedding, Wally can’t quite shake the feeling that something’s wrong or forgotten. The Justice League arrives, and there’s still no villain attack to disrupt things…as Wally and Linda get a moment to confirm they’re going through with the wedding. As the couple prepares to deliver their wedding vows, Wally realizes exactly what he’s forgotten: writing his. Of course, he doesn’t need to write them–he just reflects quickly on their time together, what they’ve been through–and he’s good. As he slips the ring onto Linda’s finger, there’s a flash of light, and he’s alone with no recollection of Linda’s existence nor that they were at the altar to be wed…while a mysterious figure looks on as Linda screams for help.

As said, the issue’s cover grabbed me. This is “THE” wedding issue. Great, ok, cool. Regular-sized, nothing fancy, just a one-issue key moment, something that happens, but while the same length as any other moment in time, is still one of those key moments one can go back to. Right? And being so used to covers “spoiling” otherwise ‘surprise’ villains or guest-stars, giving away what the issue is about (yet, the cover DOES have to “sell” one on buying the issue if they aren’t already planning to, and I’m certainly guilty of disliking generic, unrelated covers)…I figured I knew what this issue was, and was just going through the motions reading/enjoying the story, but I wasn’t expecting to be surprised. But surprise me it did, and now I very definitely want to read more.

The story itself is very good, mixing “regular” super-speed action letting us see the Flash do what he does, and that not EVERY threat has to be spread across exactly six issues of formulaic structure for a graphic novel collection. Some threats can be handled in a few pages to move the story along. Also signifying this being from an age when there were no routine collections of every half-dozen or so issues, the credits page is worked into the story itself somewhat cinematically–or at least, in a “tv” sort of fashion…showing the Kobra attack to be mere prologue to fulfill our expectation of the Flash in action in-costume and allowing the rest of the issue to focus on Wally, Linda, and co. for the wedding itself. Working other key characters in–like Impulse and Nightwing were nice touches, and though I’m more aware of than familiar with Bart, I appreciated the bit with him and seeing dynamics of “the Flash Family” that I’ve often read of but read very little of myself as yet.

The art is good, and really never left me wondering. It’s not my favorite visual style, and is rather “isolated” here as I’ve not read any significant runs on this title in probably almost a decade. I’m sure I’d appreciate it more in context, and assume it’s consistent with surrounding issues. Where varying visual styles play on actual memory for me with the Superman family of titles, I don’t have that for the Flash, which for every issue of the title I read makes me further regret never jumping in back in the ’90s when these were fresh, current, ongoing episodes of the character.

Despite mentioning “isolation” above in regards to finding this issue and how I see the art on it…the issue on the whole is not the quasi-self-contained or isolated unit I was expecting. I thankfully never got the sense that I “should have” read the previous issue to “get” what’s going on here, so it’s easy to jump INTO…but it certainly doesn’t have a hard-stop point to conclude, and successfully leaves me eager to read more, to find out who the mystery-villain is, to see how Wally and Linda get out of this mess…find out if this truly IS “the wedding issue” or if that “moment” occurs down the road in another issue, etc.

For a one-issue quarter-bin find, this issue was more than worthwhile, and I thoroughly enjoyed it, and would (in retrospect) gladly pay several dollars for it (though for bulk/quantity I’d prefer to get to load up on the series from quarter-bins!).

The Flash: Rebirth #1 [Review]

Lightning Strikes Twice

Writer: Geoff Johns
Artist: Ethan Van Sciver
Colorist: Alex Sinclair
Letterer: Rob Leigh
Assistant Editor: Chris Conroy
Editor: Joey Cavalieri
Cover: Ethan Van Sciver, Alex Sinclair
Publisher: DC Comics

We open with a mystery in this issue, as someone with a tie to or fixation on the Flashes attacks and kills people in the Central City crime lab. As other police storm the lab, the killer–who was gathering certain chemicals–seems to reenact the accident that gave Barry Allen his powers. We then move to a “welcome back!” parade being held in honor of the recently-returned Barry Allen; while those closest to him also revel in the hero’s return. Barry resists the attention and importance placed on his return. When an old foe returns, Barry is onhand to deal with the foe–though what he gets is far from what he expected.

The art for this issue is quite good…but somehow for me fails to hold up to my expectations for how much I enjoyed the art on the OTHER Rebirth mini. Very solid stuff here, and you’d be hard-pressed to find much better, though!

I’m quite underwhelmed with the story so far. With the exception of a handful of my grandfather’s old comics more than a decade ago, the only instances I’ve ever had reading Barry have been few and far between, with him making brief appearances in Wally’s life…so I don’t know how the characterization holds up (ore doesn’t) by comparison. At the moment, I’m really not interested in Barry, even after this issue, and while the issue’s end leaves me curious as to what’s caused what happened, I can’t help but wonder if it’ll come across more cliched than not.

It was Johns’ focus issue on Zoom a few years back that first really drew me into the world of the Flash, and it’s Johns’ Flash that developed any interest I really have in the character–so I’m holding out hope that my interest will develop a lot more as this series progresses.

Probably the main drawback of this issue as a whole is that it feels–more than a lot of comics–like it IS a story chopped into segments. If you ReallyHaveToKnowRightNowAsItUnfolds what’s going on, jump on this issue. If you’re just looking for what’s hopefully going to be one of THE Flash stories with great art, I suspect you’ll be better off waiting for the collected volume.

Story: 7/10
Art: 8.5/10
Whole: 7.5/10

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